The Impact of Globalization on Food Choices and Health

Updated: Apr 30


What is Globalization? Globalization is the ability to move products, services, and migration of people throughout the globe (Globalization, n.d.). It is a form of communion between countries welcoming investments made by foreigners into their local economy, easing trade of food products, and allowing companies to come and invest in their local economy with lower tariffs and issues. The Free Trade Agreements signed within the countries have a significant impact on food choices and the health of their populations. Food globalization has a considerable influence on food choices and health throughout the world. The availability of fast foods and other food sources has increased over the last decade in many countries upon the completion of the negotiations of the Free Trade Agreement with 20 countries. This agreement allows food importers and exporters to sell and exchange food products freely, with lower tariffs and taxes. But how do these trade negotiations influence food choice and the health nation? Globalization has its benefits as well as its damage. The most significant advantage is helping millions of in the communities of poor neighborhoods, reducing infectious diseases, food scarcity, and help improve their lifestyles by providing employment. The evolution of the workforce and food globalization impacts health as well. The increase in income often leads to ingesting more calories, dining out frequently, or even indulging in processed foods, which has adverse effects on health. If a person doesn't have disposable income, they are more prone to make the best out of what they have, purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers, grains, and fewer meat products. Why? Their finances do not allow them to indulge in processed foods, restaurants, and canned products. Having fast food and other unhealthy options at the disposal creates chronic health issues. And the determent of traditional foods to western diets has caused a rise in Obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other health issues that have increased in the last decade because of the availability of unhealthy foods (Mendez, 2005). Globalization has its benefits as well as its damage. The most significant advantage is helping millions of in the communities of poor neighborhoods, reducing infectious diseases, food scarcity, and help improve their lifestyles by providing employment. The evolution of the workforce and food globalization impacts health as well. The increase of income often leads to ingesting more calories, dining out frequently or even indulging in processed foods, which has adverse effects on health. If a person doesn't have disposable income, they are more prone to make the best out of what they have, purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers, grains, and fewer meat products. Why? Their finances do not allow them to indulge in processed foods, restaurants, and canned products. Having fast food and other unhealthy options at the disposal creates chronic health issues. And the determent of traditional foods to western diets has caused a rise in Obesity, cardiovascular disease diabetes, and other health issues that have increased in the last decade because of the availability of unhealthy foods (Mendez, 2005). These are the risk of Globalization when it comes to health and diets. It damages and shifts the developmental, cultural, and behavioral norms of its society. It changes food preferences. While Globalization has provided the means for moving away from famine and food scarcity, they have done a great job advertising. They have invested a significant amount of funds into advertising, causing children and adults to crave these cheap calories foods. These foods consist of refined grains, sugary drinks, overly processed animal products, and fast-food restaurants (Mendez, 2005). Studies show that advertising influences food choices in children, and parents in the count to see them eating they will buy them these foods (Story, M., & French, S., 2004). Don't get me wrong it is significant that it generates an extensive amount of income and employment for many nations. But there are no regulations like the ones instilled by the FDA in the United States require fast-food chains to report to the consumer the amount of sodium, calories, sugars, trans fat, and carbs are within the food content. There is no monitoring in what is going into the foods and how it damages one's health if consumed frequently. Is it worth it? References Globalization. N.D. BusinessDictionary.com. Retrieved from BusinessDictionary.com website: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/globalization.html Mendez MA, Monteiro CA, Popkin BM. Overweight exceeds underweight among women in most developing countries. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005; 81:714-21. Hawkes C. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of Globalization with the nutrition transition, Obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases. Global Health. 2006; 2:4. Story, M., & French, S. (2004, February 10). Food Advertising and Marketing Directed at Children and Adolescents in the US. Retrieved from https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1479-5868-1-3

#food #advertising #marketing #globalization #choices #countries #obesity #income #children #disease #hearthealth #msvictoriashealthandwellnessforum #purelife #wellness #health

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